Inequalities Towards British Rule Essay

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The colonial planter’s view on the inequality towards British rule on the colonists were hypocritical due to colonial views on foreign control, rights of an Englishmen, and treatment of slaves. The colonial English disliked the increased foreign rule onto the colony. London was increasing control over the colonies militarily, politically, and economically ever since the recent wars in the region. The failure of rallying an army and supplies needed to fight the French resulted in Britain taking away local government. Colonial plantation owners were furious over the new Royal order over them. They hated the taxes, the new acts that constricted their trade, and the taking away free will in a market. However, they were doing the same to the local…show more content…
This also including protection against whippings that resulted in harsh penalties to the perpetrator. Furthermore, if any nonwhites were to strike a white Englishman, they would receive thirty lashes to every penalty they were accused of. Rights for the Englishmen were only for the white population of the colony and anyone not white, Christian were left null and void. Colonists complained about being exploited during wars against the French and Indian tribes. The heavy taxes, forced enlistment during war, and the housing of soldiers were damping the mood of many colonists. However, the plantation colonists were actively exploiting the slaves and nonwhites on their own properties. Slaves were treated like items and sold against their will. Many were treated harshly and overworked by these same colonists who similarly cried wolf towards the British. Colonists wanted to stop being the buffer when it came to wars within European powers, but in the meantime, they treated their own slaves even worse. These major hypocrisies within the colonial planter’s view of equality for them with against the British was skewed their beliefs in foreign control Indian populations, rights toward only the white, Christian population, and exploitation amongst
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