Inequality In Human Development

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Sustainability implies that a particular pattern of development can be sustained over a long period, without major disruptions. On the other hand, enabling everyone to be capable and free to do things and be the person they want to be is the goal of human development. Inequality in human development is then essentially inequality in such capability and freedom. It will be determined by many things, but for the purpose of this paper and in accordance with the UNDP’s Human Development Index, I will look at health, education and welfare schemes as three of the most important determinants. Inequality in human development is then inequality in individual educational levels, health standards and incomes. Now a day, intellectuals and policy makers…show more content…
This means that the concept of human development applies equally to rich and poor people or to rich and poor countries. The second perspective is known as the ‘derivational’ perspective, which implies that the concept of human development is motivated by issues of poverty and inequality. Thus, it is the concerns of the most deprived section of society, which become the key issues of human development. The human development approach in the context of countries such as India may be identified more with the “derivational” perspective. The term ‘equity’ as a key feature of the human development approach has been used to emphasis on this perspective. ‘Equity’ is a term used in a variety of contexts, but a common idea underlying the use of this term is that of fairness. It lays emphasis on particular groups in society, who are socially disadvantaged and may require distinct policies and interventions to address their disadvantages and bring them to a socio-economic level at par with the rest of…show more content…
Unlike other states where these issues are largely restricted to the tribal zones, in Gujarat it is spread across districts and even in the commercial capital of the state, Gujarat. The latest Socio Economic Review of Gujarat (2014-15) which was released in February, 2016, showed that there were 1.97 lakh malnourished and 24,762 severe acute malnourished children in 46 talukas in Banaskantha, Patan, Navsari, Junagadh and Kheda districts. Additionally, 1.47 lakh of the 43 lakh children at anganwadis in the state were found to be suffering from severe acute malnutrition. The report of the Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG) in October 2013 on Gujarat emphasis the poor level of health in the state. According to it, Gujarat’s figure of “severely malnourished” children (4.56 %) exceeded that national average (3.33%). Additionally, every third child was underweight and close to 1.87 crore people had been deprived of the benefits of the Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS) because the government had not sanctioned the required number of Anganwadis. Ahmedabad alone had a staggering number of 85,000 children who were
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