Inequitable Healthcare

1575 Words7 Pages
Inequitable distribution of healthcare between rural and remote areas is an intractable global problem. Rural communities are in generally sicker, less educated and have higher healthcare needs; however irony is that urban communities receive better healthcare and funding in the budget by the government. Hart’s ‘inverse care law’ states that these with the greatest need of healthcare usually have the worst access to healthcare (Wilson, 2009). Inequitable healthcare is recognised as one of the major reasons for rapid urbanisation. Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) performed a systematic review with an objective to evaluate impact of various strategies to recess the inequitable healthcare between rural and urban areas.…show more content…
In the context of these pressures, there has been a range of reforms and initiatives, with leaders normally in the forefront of their implementation. These pressures can influence particularly upon their capability to perform successfully, and this is especially the case in rural and remote areas where the burden of workloads and an insufficient supply of health care experts can wrongly impact even the most dedicated leader (Buykx, Humphreys, & Pashen,…show more content…
These have transformed the basic style of different health care institutions. Different facilities and procedures once given through healthcare centres are now being given out of hospital, and some acute hospitals, especially in rural areas, have been modified into multipurpose services presenting some acute care, aged care and social health services. Health service leaders have had to adjust to these modifications. A market approach has brought regarding modifications in the health sector that have often been quite unsuitable for rural and remote areas (Spears, 2010). Modern technologies, growing costs, rising consumer expectations and enhanced litigation have had considerable impacts on the management load. Reducing length of stay in hospitals, enhanced ambulatory care and the enhanced load of chronic diseases have also influenced the roles of health leaders in different health care contexts and have implications for their training and professional growth. Performance systems for leaders are currently more result -oriented, with a wider concentration on population health, cost, quality and activity control. This orientation can be a genuine issue to individual leader who have a natural inclination for procedures or people, despite than results. Information technology has enhanced simply
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