Informed Consent: A Case Study

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An informed consent is concise information that gives the patient an opportunity to comprehend the risks and benefits of the medical attention they will or will not receive (Illingworth & Parmet, 2006). It gives the patient the ability to have a legitimate decision making choice while clarifying any questions the patient may have for the doctor (De Bord, 2014). Eyal (2011), suggested that the main components of an informed consent consist of protection, autonomy, and trust. The informed consent protects the patient’s health and welfare while autonomy helps to promote decision making of one’s own self. Trust is very important because the community should be able to trust their care takers and act in accordance with with their medical advice.…show more content…
US Legal stated that wrongful death statutes vary from state to state, they define who may file this type of lawsuit, and the limits that are applied to an award of damages are clearly outlined. If a wrongful death lawsuit is filed, it must be proven that the acts or omissions of the defendant were the cause of the decedent’s injuries and death meaning that the defendant’s wrongful conduct created a natural, direct series of events that led to the injury. According to Illingworth & Parmet (2006), in the case of Shine v. Vega, 429 Mass. 456 (1999), Dr. Shine sued Dr. Vega for the wrongful death of his daughter, Catherine Shine. On March 18, 1990, Catherine Shine suffered an asthma attack and she was taken to the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) in order to receive medical attention. It was said that Catherine was highly educated on her illness because her father was a doctor. Catherine agreed to go MGH under the condition that she would only receive oxygen. She was not pleased with the medical attention that she was receiving so she decided to
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