Informed Consent In Schools

326 Words2 Pages
Elisa, I found your post to be well thought out and answered the question asked. Informed consent is a must have when working in the school system. Per Ansaldo (2011) one problem noted with response-to-intervention (RTI) models, is that finding the student who needs extra help is easy, but identifying the teacher who may need assistance is not as easy. Moreover, focusing on the teacher being able to teach all learners should be more important than detecting students (Ansaldo, 2011). An RTI tier level approach in schools would focus on evidence-based services available to students, monitoring of students for progress, based on progress a decision collaboration, if necessary more intensive use of interventions, and evaluations (Saeki, Jimerson, Earhart, Hart, Renshaw, Singh, & Stewart 2011). The decision making and collaboration must include the parents and those directly in contact with the child (Brown, Pryzwansky, & Schulte, 2011). I think confidentiality would be a problem with the administrative staff, those who may file student’s records, or rather flaws in record keeping within the school system. Additionally, I feel the school counselor, teacher, and parent should have access to information about the student, so I would hope those records are kept confidential. Furthermore, if the teacher is responsible for monitoring the child day to day, it is their responsibility to keep the student’s log private (Rollins, Mursky, Shah-Coltrane, & Johnsen, 2009).…show more content…
(2011). RTI promoting triage education?. District Administration, 47(9), 12. Brown, D., Pryzwansky, W. B., & Schulte, A. C. (2011). Psychological consultation and collaboration (7th ed.). Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson Education Inc. Rollins, K., Mursky, C. V., Shah-Coltrane, S., & Johnsen, S. K. (2009). RtI Models for Gifted Children. Gifted Child Today, 32(3),
Open Document