Innocence Vs Reality In To Kill A Mockingbird

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Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird follows the story of Jean Louise “Scout” Finch and Jeremy “Jem” Finch. Growing up in small-town Maycomb, Alabama, the children are exposed to many intense, controversial events. Their father, Atticus Finch, portrays the moral character example of which they follow. In this story, the sibling relationship between Scout and Jem exemplifies the true meaning of the work: innocence versus reality. Lee’s portrayal of the two characters is quite fascinating, and accurate to the sibling standards of both now and the past; the bickering, role-playing games, and the curiosity that Jem and Scout have throughout the novel presents a relevant addition to the plot as a whole. The book is divided into two parts.…show more content…
The children are exposed to reality by inquiring Atticus about the defense. Once again, their relationship is the key to discovering the truth. Atticus relates to Jem on a level that he can handle, and then Jem will tell Scout. Another factor that develops the plot is Jem’s transition into his teen years. He is growing throughout the whole novel, and with this he becomes more independent of Scout. She misses his youth, yet respects his development of character. This, I believe, is the threshold for Scout’s new ‘lease on life.’ As the novel’s storyline demonstrates a unveiling truth of reality in Scout’s life, Jem’s relationship with her becomes definitively more real as well. Scout and Jem’s sibling relationship strictly defines the transition of innocent youth into the reality of life. As the events of the story become more into depth and complication, the connection between the two protagonists seems to become more business-like, yet it never ceases. The one thing that the story never fails to wrongly define is family. Jem and Scout are whole, and they are willing to take on each challenge that is thrown at them in To Kill a Mockingbird, no matter what. This connection seals the plot’s meaning by use of a true

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