Two Critical Elements Of Instructional Scaffolding

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1. What are the two critical elements to keep in mind when using instructional scaffolding?
 Modeling and Practice are the two critical elements to keep in mind when using instructional scaffolding. Modeling is when the teacher demonstrates or models each step in a task or strategy multiple times, so that through repetition and modeling the students understand both how to perform each step and why. Practice is when the students are allowed to either work individually or in groups with the teacher to practice a task or strategy.
2. Briefly describe the three approaches to instructional scaffolding presented in this Module.
 Content scaffolding is when the teacher selects content that is not too difficult or unfamiliar for students learning
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I would use content scaffolding because it’s important to reinforce background knowledge and start from the beginning with a student, while making new connections with them through familiar or highly interesting content that motivates the student to dig deeper. I would also use material scaffolding in the form of a cue sheet with guided examples and possibly a mnemonic device that would help students perform and complete the task of long division. I would reinforce the use of a mnemonic device and guided example through constant modelling with verbalization and practice until the student has mastered long division. This could be considered task scaffolding with the use of performing the task of solving long division by modeling and practicing the mnemonic device with the student one step at a time until he or she can independently use the task by his or herself. The guided examples would also serve as task scaffolding that would be reinforced with verbalization, eventually be phased out over the course of the lesson. The use of constant visual aids in material scaffolding would also help the student, especially if the mnemonic device was a poster in the front of the…show more content…
Second, I would introduce a problem that the student might find interesting and excite their interest for the challenge of solving a long division problem. Third, I would model how to work through some long division problems with the use of material scaffolding in the form of the mnemonic device and guided examples mentioned in answer 4-B. Fourth, I would use the mnemonic device as a handout, and poster on a wall, to let practice my student practice long division problems with the mnemonic device as a reminder tool. The mnemonic device could be “Dad, Mom, Sister, and Brother,” which would stand for “Divide, Multiply, Subtract, and Bring Down.” I would also model and practice the guided examples with the student on a handout. Fifth, I would begin task scaffolding by walking through each step in solving long division using the mnemonic device provided above along with the guided examples. I would constantly refer to both the mnemonic device and guided examples as I verbalized the task. Sixth, I would also use modelling and practice to help my student understand the patterns in solving long division, and support his or her confidence in his or he ability to perform and complete the individual steps of long

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