Ethics Of Spying

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Intelligence Ethics is the second chapter of the Ethics of Spying: A Reader for the Intelligence Professional textbook. It written by R.V. Jones. This chapter of the textbook explains the national security, and its techniques along with several ethical problems. It is a very amusing and interesting chapter by far. I have chosen to talk about several topics that I found really fascinating such as allies respect, diplomatic bags, agents being expendable, tortures, and a few more others. When working in the intelligence field, I think that an intelligence professional should have respect for their allies. Prying into another countries for secrets is like someone trying to pry into your personal and private life. If you do not want to be pried…show more content…
and Block 26 sections reminds me of the term utilitarianism. Utilitarianism is the “greater good for the greater number of people.” Sometimes when sacrificing something, we do not know whether it is actually worth it or not. For me, sacrificing agents are unethical, unless that agent gave up information about what he or she knows, or secrets about his or her country. I do not think sacrificing agents is a good idea, especially when he or she is loyal to their country. Unless an agent betrayed his or her country, then he or she should be sacrificed to protect the greater number of people. In the Conventry story, the Conventry and its people were sacrificed to save many. Unfortunately, that was the only way in such a short-term advantage of knowing and acting on the information. In my perspective, letting the Conventry get bombed is unethical. It is such a painful and unfortunate sacrifice, but was it really worth it? For that reason, I strongly believe that they could have taken another approach to that situation, and saved the Conventry and the many other…show more content…
In all honestly, I think that the whole government set up is beautifully organized. There are different organizations focusing on specific tasks in which all are combined into one. Everything is connected like the nerves in our body. It is agreeable that there are risk factors in the Congressional oversight. Having the Congress and White House involved is a bit complicated because the CIA won’t be able to do their top secret task without it being known, overlooked, and approved by the certain officials. I am not sure how the system entirely works and how fast it goes. I am assuming that having an oversight committee is a bit time consuming, especially when the intelligence has to wait for the officials in the committee to meet and discuss the tasks. Like what if the intelligence is currently on a dangerous mission and they needed to do something drastic but they needed the approval of the oversight committee? If the input of the intelligence is important in the government for foreign related affairs as discussed from the previous chapter, then shouldn’t the government be allowed to express their opinions and recommendations to them? After all, the CIA is still part of the
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