Intertextuality In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

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In Mary Shelley’s novel, Frankenstein(1818) are a lot of intertextual references that can help the reader understand the novel and not see it just like a story where a man is terrified by his creation. I shall explain what intertextuality means: “Intertextuality is the interrelationship between texts, especially works of literature; the way that similar or related texts influence, reflect, or differ from each other.” (http://www.dictionary.com/ ) I’m going to continue with the examples that I found in Mary Shelley’s novel and explain what they refer to. One example of intertextuality in this novel is Shelley’s use of William Wordsworth’s poem “Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey” written in 1798. Victor describes his dear friend,…show more content…
On the other hand, Shelley puts in balance Victor’s and also Dante’s character. She brings both of them closer through the fact that they have both suffered emotionally and the feelings of disgust that they endured in all their journeys, when they see the unfortunate suffering, their chosen punishment for their sins. Victor ends up by being a slave to the bad actions of his monster and is forced to watch his loved ones being murdered one by one and he remains powerless. Both Victor and Dante suffer, the difference is that in Dante’s Inferno the damned must wait for death to enter their personal hell, but in the case of Victor Frankenstein his hell becomes life itself. Another intertextual reference is directly related to the title itself. The Myth of Prometheus tells the story of Prometheus who was a Greek Titan and stole one of Zeus’ lightning bolts and used it to give humans the gift of fire. As a punishment, he is chained to a cliff and every day an eagle eats at his liver but until the next day, it grows back. Victor is Shelley’s modern embodiment of Prometheus as in his fascination by the power of electricity. Victor suffers from the use of it when he realizes what he has done. This is the result of his curiosity, his pride and the fact that he has defied the laws of

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