Introduction To Child Studies Case Study

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Introduction to Child Studies: Written individual assignment (EXA2) 1. Brockliss and Montgomery (2013: 79) present three major themes in European construction of childhood. These three are themes are “childhood as a time of evil and wildness” (80), “childhood as a blank slate” (82), and “childhood as a time of innocence” (83). In this exam response, each of the three will be briefly described according to Brockliss and Montgomery, and the relevant educational approaches to each will be discussed. Finally, the expression “childhood as a social construction” will be briefly defined. The theme that constructs children as evil and “innately sinful” (Brockliss and Montgomery 2013: 80) is rooted in Christian thought and theology which…show more content…
This began prompting questions regarding the morality and social concern for children working such long hours and in such harsh conditions (Woodhead 2013: 118). This concern further prompted child study to evaluate how children’s growth and development may be affected by child labor and potential deprivation of childhood. Such study began to establish norms and standards regarding children’s development; distinctions in normality and abnormality were formed as an attempt to monitor healthy…show more content…
In articulating this critical response, Gallacher and Kehily (2013: 227) refer to work by researchers Prout and James (1997) who outline certain characteristics of sociocultural approaches to the study of childhood which “value children’s contributions to society on their own terms” (Gallacher and Kehily 2013: 227). Such approaches see children as active in their own construction rather than mere subjects of a programmed developmental process. Nevertheless, Gallacher and Kehily (2013) also emphasize that Prout and James’ outlined characteristics do not “adequately summarise all of the diverse work in the sociocultural study of childhood, but it does provide a useful summary of some key ideas within the field” (227). Gallacher and Kehily (2013) further discuss this “binary opposition becoming/being” (240) by identifying the two historical approaches to understanding childhood: developmental and sociological. Both of these approaches seek to understand the process of becoming adult and the process of becoming social, respectively. Yet “the new social studies of childhood sought to abandon this concentration on children as adults-in-the-making and instead sought to take them seriously as
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