African American Identity Essay

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The development of America brought the introduction to new ideas, experiences and different cultures coming together. Both non-European and European groups of people traveled and settled into this new world to find new land to conquer or find salvation. Many of these groups faced hardships coming into this new world, as they soon learned their differences would define them. The British would be deemed superior to their religion, ethics, and skin color would dominate the perception of the “true” American. The Irish and African Americans were two groups that came to America in hopes for better opportunities and a life they could build without hardship. They, however, both face great difficulties achieving this, as their old and new identities…show more content…
It was for the exploitation and use of these people for work and servitude at the request of the British. Many English people believed that “the color black was freighted with an array of negative images” and thus depicted Blacks as these weak, evil beings (Takaki 50). They saw them not as humans, but as objects to use at their bidding so that wealthy plantation owners could become even wealthier. Even if they were deemed “free”, they were still treated as the lowest class of people and not given any chances to really ground roots. The Northern states, who did not promote the use of slavery, “erected barriers to the entry of blacks” as they felt they didn’t want the “burden” of these people (Gjerde 87). African Americans were being hidden under the shadow of this perception that they could not be assimilated and that they must be separated in everyday activities. There was a fear that if African Americans and white people mixed, such as in schools, it would taint the purity and image of society and being American (Takaki 102). This perception would have even more people discriminate against Blacks, as they wanted to keep the image they have set out as the only acceptable thing. Anything that was remotely different from the norm would be deemed as going against what America truly stood
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