Irony In Romeo And Juliet

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Love is complex in Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare by making various characters dramatically illogical, significantly overjoyed, or incredibly angry. Love’s influence on Romeo and Juliet make them noticeably illogical. Romeo, near the beginning of the story, had a strong affection for a woman named Rosaline. When Romeo is acting unusually depressed, his cousin Benvolio questions what is bothering him. Romeo explains that his love, Rosaline, does not love him back, and continues to describe the reasoning behind his sadness: “Tut, I have lost myself. I am not here. This is not Romeo. He’s some other where” (1.1.205-206). Romeo’s recent behavior is so concerning that one of his closest friends has to ensure that he is doing okay. When…show more content…
After Romeo meets his supposed destined lover, Juliet, he returns to talk to his friends Mercutio and Benvolio after planning his marriage. Mercutio notices and points out Romeo’s new, content behavior in contrast to his old, joyless attitude: “Why is not this better than groaning for love? Now art thou sociable, now art thou Romeo, now art thou what thou art - by art as well as by nature” (2.4.90-93). Although Mercutio believes Romeo’s change in etiquette is caused by the absence of love, it is in fact the presence of it. Mercutio observes that something has made Romeo much happier, and it is indeed Romeo’s previous encounters with Juliet that have created this effect of increased contentment. Love has been found to generate happiness within Juliet as well, which she poetically describes. Romeo has previously had a romantic dance and conversation with his new acquaintance, Juliet, at the Capulet’s party, and snuck back to Juliet’s balcony so he could further confess his love for her. Juliet reveals that she, too, shares these feelings for Romeo, and tries to illustrate how vivid her devotion is: “My bounty is as boundless as the sea, my love as deep. The more I give to thee, the more I have, for both are infinite” (2.2.140-142). Juliet makes an analogy to her love for Romeo being as deep as the ocean and her desire to love him as wide as the sea is, too. Additionally, she states that her love for…show more content…
During Juliet’s conversation with Lady Capulet regarding the death of Tybalt, Capulet walks in to share news of Juliet's suitor, Paris. While Juliet appreciates the gesture of her father find a potential husband, she politely declines due to her relationship with Romeo. Capulet is outraged and disowns Juliet for apparent stubbornness, but Juliet attempts to justify her decision: “Proud can I never be of what I hate, but thankful even for hate that is meant love” (3.5.152-153). Juliet explains that she dreads the idea of Capulet arranging for Paris to marry her, secretly due to her complications with Romeo, but loves that same idea because she understands that her father’s intentions were only of care. Juliet is able to be empathetic to her father’s temporary anger since she knew it is only a result of his deep love and support. Tybalt is shown to display signs of infuriation due to love when he discovers Romeo at a Capulet party. Capulet is hosting a gigantic party for anyone who is not a Montague, and plans to organize a fun experience for all. Tybalt, the nephew of Capulet, is not so pleased when he discovers Romeo, a Montague, has snuck into the party. He immediately wants to fight Romeo for disrespecting his family, but his uncle, Capulet, resists since he knows Romeo is respectable and he does not want to ruin the mood of the party. Tybalt expresses his frustration to himself: “Patience
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