Is College Worth It Analysis

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There are different advantages and opportunities given to college graduates that make the effort to obtain the education that will aid a future profession. One reason college is worth the cost, is the fact that there are fewer jobs that only require a high school diploma. Another is that higher paying jobs require a college degree. The last reason is that college educates students to build a better foundation for a future career, and also gives experience how the job would be. Without an education, higher than a college degree, it could be difficult to get a job. According to David Leonhardt, “College graduates, though hardly immune from the downturn, are also far likely to be unemployed than non-graduates.”(Leonhardt). In other words, Leonhardt…show more content…
In “Is College Worth It?” it states that, “Adults who graduated from a four-year college believe that, on average, they are earning $20,000 more a year as a result of having gotten that college degree.” (Is College Worth It?). Statistics show that college graduates tend to acquire more money based on the fact that they have a degree that shows they studied to work in that field of study. Of course, many will probably disagree with this assertion because college graduates will also be having to pay off all their student loans after they have graduated from college. Ben Wieder disagrees when he says, “Students today are taking on more debt, and recently tightened bankruptcy laws making it more difficult to shake that debt...” (Wieder). Even though these college graduates will be in debt, they will learn to manage their money in order to pay off their debt and live a stable…show more content…
Michael Roth himself writes, “Post-secondary education should help students to discover what they love to do, to get better at it, and to develop the ability to continue learning so that they become agents of change- not victims of it.” (Roth). In other words, Roth believes that college is meant to help students discover not only what career they have a passion for, but builds on that career to become capable of making a difference. On the other hand, Princeton economist Alan Blinder disagrees by saying that, “the crucial distinction in the emerging labor market is not between those with less or more education, but between those whose services can be delivered over a wire and those who must do their work in person or on site.” (Crawford). Blinder argues that people don’t really care about the amount of education someone has, they are just worried about getting the job done and the efficiency of the work. In reality, if it comes down just getting the job done, would the employer want someone who is educated empirically or would the employer want someone who has just been shown what to do but cannot explain how they get the job done? College is an enormous and important expense that most high school graduates have to decide whether or not the education is worth all the time and if it 's a squander of money. College is worth every dime
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