Isolation And Isolation In Frankenstein

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In the novel Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, the two main characters that the book centers around are the scientist Victor Frankenstein and his creation, known as the monster. While these two characters share the bond of life, their connection is not as strong as it could have been. Due to a multitude of factors, including the reaction to the appearance of the monster, these two characters were pushed further within themselves until everyone around them was gone. This alienation drove many of the important plot points throughout the story. In the novel Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, isolation proves to be destructive force for both Victor Frankenstein and the monster. However, while the monster lashes out at his forced alienation by killing others,…show more content…
The type of isolation that Victor experiences correlates strongly with introvertedness and loneliness leading to progress in another field. Victor, as seen throughout the novel, works best when he is isolation and away from the distractions of his family and friends. Frankenstein seems almost annoyed with other people trying to spend time with him when his mind was otherwise occupied with his task. He says “...and truly I rejoiced that thus I should be saved many hours of lonely, maddening re ection. Nay, Henry might stand between me and the intrusion of my foe. If I were alone, would he not at times force his abhorred presence on me to remind me of my task or to contemplate its progress?” (185). Frankenstein is inconvenienced by Henry Clerval’s presence, and desires to be alone to work on the female…show more content…
However, while the monster’s isolation is forced upon him by others, Frankenstein isolates himself, creating insurmountable social deficits. The monster’s isolation comes from the fear of the villagers reaction to his appearance. They react in a strongly negative manner towards him, so he relates society to being cruel to him. As well, Frankenstein abandoning his hours old creation due to fear and disgust deeply impacts the monster’s ability to interact with others. Victor Frankenstein’s isolation is self-inflicted. He does this in order to make progress in creating the monsters. He feels the need to cut off the people he loves in his life while experimenting in order to not feel the guilt and unnaturalness of what he is accomplishing. While the alienation is brought about in different ways, these two character’s isolation causes dire consequences for those around
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