Isolation In Frankenstein

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During the 19th century, the use of Dark Romantic writing became a prominent style in Europe. Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley, illustrates a horrific story of a scientist’s journey to creating life from the dead. The pursuit for knowledge causes certain characters’, such as Victor Frankenstein and Robert Walton, to explore the depths of the unknown,without paying attention to the consequences that lie ahead. Because of the constant desire to obtain recognition for one’s work, it causes Victor Frankenstein and Robert Walton to become isolated from the real world, and ultimately make themselves and the people around them suffer. Being raised in the mountains of Geneva, Victor Frankenstein’s upbringing depicts the early learning of knowledge.…show more content…
As he leaves home for college, he fuels his ambition of creating life from the dead. From the various studies, he secretly experiments his own design. By creating the monster, the experiment shows the outcome that can occur if knowledge is taken too far. Frankenstein becomes an addict to his own work and study. The overstepping of boundaries, in the long run, gives Frankenstein longlife punishment for his actions. His family, in addition to his wife, Elizabeth, are harmed in the process. The continuing knowledge that Frankenstein constantly searches for brings him closer to the unknown world. According to an English philosopher, John Locke, author of An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, “The Soul begins to have ideas when it begins to perceive” (ch.1). Since Frankenstein has constantly expressed a delight for natural science, it is possible for his mind to wander off and explore territories that are unknown by other scientists. His creation of a creature with unexplored human abilities shows the capacity of Frankenstein 's mind once it is left alone. The secret behavior that he conceals from his family and friends ultimately casts great danger to his own…show more content…
The encounterment of the scientist and the explorer ultimately show the outcome one has when knowledge is pursued. The dying scientist expresses to Walton, “You seek for knowledge and wisdom, as I once did; and I ardently hope that the ratification of your wishes may not be a serpent to sting you, as mine has been” (Shelley 14). This confession is pondered in Walton’s mind throughout the trip. In the end, Walton turns the ship around, and prevents his sailors and himself from dying in the undiscovered Arctic sea. Unlike Frankenstein, Walton has the opportunity to stop his pursuitment before it is too late. From his decision, he learns that the journey towards the unknown can possess fatal consequences. The story of Frankenstein ultimately displays the consequences that can happen when one tries to pursue knowledge. In the case of Victor Frankenstein and Robert Walton, both men want to obtain recognition for their work. The two men embrace the thirst for knowledge, however, both are uneducated about the possible consequences that can be present. Because of the constant desire to obtain recognition for one’s work, it causes Victor Frankenstein and Robert Walton to become isolated from the real world, and ultimately make themselves and the people around them
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