Isolation In WW1

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From the inception of the United States as a nation, to World War 2, the US have basically been an isolationist nation. Many historians attributes the US isolationism tendencies during its early ears to the way the country was founded. The thirteen American colonies were populated by people who fled from Europe, where there was religious persecution, economic privation and war. The colonists wanted to be away for all that. The distance and the rigors of travel from Europe accentuate the remoteness of the New World, setting the tone for the isolationist mindset. In addition, the geographic of the United States, for example it many navigable waterways, its climate and it been buffered by two oceans, the Atlantic to the East and the Pacific…show more content…
The United States felt secure, and felt that it did not need foreign entanglements. But in 1914 Europe was thrown into turmoil. The United States tried its endeavor best to remain isolated and out of conflict. But in 1917 the Germans sank the Lusitania, a British luxury liner, killing 128 Americans who were travelling on the ship. This action infuriated the American public and the US government. The United States would break its isolationism and enter the war. America’s entry in the war, even though late, 1917 assured victory for the British and French against the Germans. At the end of the war, the United States was quick to leave behind its European commitments regardless of President Woodrow Wilson’s effort’s to have the US more engaged in world affairs through the League of Nations. Again, the Russian revolution intervene because of the wretched condition for peasants and workers in that nation. After the success of their revolution in Russia, the leaders of that revolution invited workers in the United States to up rise against their political and economic system in the US. Nonetheless, American workers ignored this invitation, instead they formed unions to advocate for them. This isolationist policies of the United States would continue until World War 2
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