Jack And Piggy

1091 Words5 Pages
The savage emitted a heinous noise. He and his companions, refusing to blend with the ancient picture of boys in school uniforms, start yelling and running after a pig, haphazardly throwing twigs at it. On the other side of the resort-like island, where the savages live, the sun's smile scorches a small number of boys as they decide how to preserve what little they have left of their society. Society, the interactions and the network of different special connections between people, is the glue of human civilization. And here, plunged into anarchy, the society has become a crumbled former shell of itself. Lord Of The Flies, written by British writer William Golding, presents the downfall of a stranded group of young school boys on…show more content…
During Jack and his choir boys' encounter with Ralph and Piggy, Jack controlled the choir boys with an iron hand; Piggy relayed his observations: "He [Piggy] was intimidated by this uniform superiority and the offhand authority in Merridew's [Jack's] voice" (21). Piggy was able to illustrate Jack's ability to command the choir boys. Produced by inducing fear, Jack's forced "uniform superiority", implies a sense of cohesion and unity between the choir boys under Jack. Also Jack's "offhand authority" over the choir boys, who later became the hunters, is a trait of totalitarianism, a governing style where the ruling party, or Jack in this case, controls the people and every aspect of their life with fear. He uses this fear, by bullying and discriminating others, to get what he wants. Attempting to disrupt everything Ralph attempts to do, Jack symbolizing the clash between totalitarianism and democracy. Jack had already undermined Ralph's rule, dividing the boys. Jack, making empty promises, such as meat and enjoying themselves, lures the members of the tribe to join him and leave Ralph. Strangling Ralph out of power and caring more about himself and the hunt, Jack careens the tribe into disaster as he neglects his responsibilities. Also, to help Jack enforce his bidding, he enlists the help of Roger. Roger represents a sadist, someone who would…show more content…
The boys are attracted to the beast like bees are to honey. In the beginning, the boys rejected the idea of such a beast to exist on the island, but once the young boy who conjured the beast could not be found, their viewpoint shifted. Using the kids, Golding was reenacting the Cold War, illustrating the battle of his time. The fear and unrest sank into the boys of the beast. The “beastie” started to grow within their minds. Any type of situation or problem they met was a sign of the beast. The beast was also the fear present in people during the Cold War. During the Red Scare in America, a time period when the people of America were afraid of a Communistic uprising and of USSR spies infiltrating the US, Americans were suspicious of everyone and everything. Relatives would be suspicious and doubtful of each other and so would friends, colleagues, peers, and etc. In conclusion, the fear harbored by the children, as the American people, in the form of the "beast" disabled their ability to work together, destroying the remaining parts of society. Golding emphasizes that allowing someone to prey on our fears and rule us, as such in totalitarianism, does not work because letting an individual, such as Jack, dictate what we do suppresses our freedom, equality, and justice along with becoming
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