James Hamilton's Influence On American Culture

455 Words2 Pages
Back in the early days of the United States, James Hamilton wrote about his experiences as well as relationships, which in hindsight illustrate how different life was in the small communities that comprised the early colonies as compared to the modern American society. To begin, Hamilton relates an incident where he had to forcefully demand payment from an employer by the name of Mr. Wendell. This incident actually developed in to a violent encounter on the part of Hamilton. Though Hamilton clearly felt his actions were justified, he would have found himself in prison if he had dealt Mr. Wendell in such a manner in the modern American society. Clearly during the colonial period, recourse for perceived injustices could be carried out in a vigilante…show more content…
In actuality, many influential early Americans engaged in activity which contemporary society would consider criminal. Maybe today’s current politician’s actions correlate with those of our early American heroes and founding fathers? Hamilton even acknowledged writing love letters to his wife while living and carousing with prostitutes. It is ironic, how respectable people down through history engaged in lying and illicit activities, but contemporary society perceives the same despicable behavior as a new occurrences pointing to a downward spiral in contemporary society. When looking at colonial America, it is interesting to see that the acceptance of vigilante justice and the practice of residential hospitality has so drastically changed; however, the human condition of engaging in dishonesty and despicable behavior never seems to change. Though it seems that the practices of today are better hidden from the public eye, citizens we would call despicable, if their true personalities and personal activities were known, still find their way to positions of significant influence and power in every aspect of American
Open Document