Jane Eyre Trials

547 Words3 Pages
In the novel Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Bronte, the main character, Jane goes from being a feisty but withdrawn ten year old to a mature, level-headed grown woman. Jane’s years of childhood are not peaceful though, she goes through many trials that not only shape Jane herself, but the novel’s meaning. The trials that Jane faces and the way she reacts and responds to these trials ultimately shape the meaning of the novel;, people don’t have to establish themselves the way society wants them to. One of the first trials that Jane has to go through is the death of her parents. Jane’s parents were poor and unable to leave Jane any money to support herself. This lead to Jane having to rely on the charity of Mrs. Reed. Society placed Jane’s societal…show more content…
Reed sends Jane to school to get rid of her, because she feels that Jane doesn’t deserve to be in her house any longer. As this school Jane mellows out, but she also works hard to fight the same stereotypes she faced at Gateshead. While at Lowood school, Jane gains and then loses a friend, has to face more abuse from a male figure, and has to tolerate harsh living conditions. Through all of that Jane is determined to become educated and break the mold that society has built for her. As Jane grows and finishes school she does indeed break the mold. Jane continues to be educated and starts working as a governess. She is not the poor, uneducated lost soul that society, and Mrs. Reed, wanted her to become. Jane is also still fighting the stereotype of a woman being controlled by the men around her. When Jane finds out that Mr. Rochester is married and attempting to make Jane his mistress, she leaves. When St. John Rivers becomes controlling and manipulative of Jane, she doesn’t bear it, she leaves. Jane’s childhood is full of trials and adversity, but it is those moments that enlighten Jane to the very real fact that she can break the mold. Jane becomes highly educated, she begins working, and she doesn’t let anyone control her or her feelings. Jane does break the mold and in doing so the significance of the novel shines through; that people don’t have to be defined by society’s definition of them. Jane proves that this meaning is
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