Japanese-American Internment Camps

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In American history, there have been few disastrous attacks against the country that have caused masses of casualties and chaos throughout the United States. On Sunday, December seventh, 1941, around eight o’clock in the morning, a bombing occurred from Japan at the American naval base, called Pearl Harbor, in Hawaii. Despite various arguments against this attack occurring at all prior to it, the Japanese pulled through and surprised America and its soldiers with an intent to destroy the Pacific Fleet. There were two thousand fatalities and one thousand people injured, including sixty-eight civilians. The attack on Pearl Harbor occurred due to many decades of tension between Japan and the United States. Japan decided that the best possible…show more content…
A profuse amount of Japanese-Americans were declared guilty of becoming traitors and committing acts of treason against America when the tension between Japan and the United States heightened to a point of war. Some of these people were loyal to America and were citizens since birth. Since their ancestors were Japanese, they were forced to infiltrate American detention camps. Intelligence Services claimed that all Japanese people were deceiving America, and this can never be considered legitimate evidence. Despite this, internment camps were active. Due to President Roosevelt’s request to formulate a report having to do with the loyalty of Japanese-Americans, Curtis B. Munson (Special Representative of the State Department) wrote in his report called “Munson Report” in November of 1941, “It is easy to get on the suspect list, merely a speech in favor of Japan at some banquet being sufficient to land one there. The Intelligence Services are generous with the title of suspect and are taking no chances” (Document D). Innocent people were forced to leave their homes and their belongings despite the simple fact that they were not yet proven guilty. Although there was surveillance on specific people, Intelligence Services easily gave the classification of a spy. There was no individual review that could point out acts of sabotage from these Japanese-Americans. If a…show more content…
Many innocent people who were citizens of the United States were unjustly taken away from their lives and put into internment camps for reasons that were illogical. Today, Japanese Internment is viewed as immoral due to America’s improved mindset. Americans have learned that discrimination is unacceptable and that large decisions having to do with the lives of thousands of people must be thought out thoroughly and rationally. Although 1941 was a year of fear and panic, the circumstances should have been overviewed assiduously by America. If each dire situation was thought out like this, occurrences like Japanese Internment would not repeat itself in American or global
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