Japanese Observation Report

1002 Words5 Pages
As I entered the narrow blue walls of The Righting a Wrong: Japanese Americans and World War II exhibit located in the American History Museum, I was surprised. Never would I have thought our government would have similar concentration camps as the ones the Germans had. The exhibit had dull smooth dark shades to create a serious ambience. Located on the narrow walls was brief information about the Japanese people and their heritage. Then, upon reading this information I discovered that our government captured, imprisoned, and separated Japanese American families who were then forced to work for a minimum amount of money, food and water. Our government held Japanese Americans in concentration camps because of the event that started World…show more content…
There descriptive pictured on the wall that showcased the living conditions in which Japanese people resided. They were living in tar-paper barrack-like structures, which were surrounded by barbed wires. These camps were in areas surrounded by swamps and deserts. There was no privacy for bathrooms, so they had a communal bathroom, with few sanitary supplies. Despite being incarcerated for four years, the Japanese Americans wanted to maintain a normal life; they started sport teams, church and schooling. The exhibit had pictures of some of the Japanese citizens fortunate enough to have passes that allowed them to serve in the U.S. military or work closely with camp…show more content…
Many of them were participants in strikes and other civic conferences. To the United States, this was an act of disobedience and as a punishment the Japanese Americans were put in higher security or in segregated areas. To test camp resident loyalty questionnaires were created. If they answered no, then the residents were placed in high maximum security. However, the resistance to follow orders was only the beginning of a new era for the Japanese’s American citizen. As it drew close to the ending of World War II, members of the Supreme Court were ruling against holding Americans citizens without having criminal charges. After the decision was made Japanese Americans made their way back into society as free citizen. However, that would come at a price because they were walking back into a society that was racist and prejudiced. Not only that but there were limited resources for the Japanese to reenter what they once called home. The only resources they had acquired were the crafty things that they had made while
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