Jealousy And Iago's Manipulation In Othello

1579 Words7 Pages
In Shakespeare’s tragic play, Othello, the play centers around the calamitous ruin of the marriage of Othello and Desdemona within Venice, Italy perpetrated by the villainous, vengeful Iago, a malicious man who vows to do anything within his power to destroy Othello’s state of being through psychological tactics of manipulation and dishonesty. Although, Iago was the sole mastermind in orchestrating the plot to bring Othello down, ultimately other characters within the play played a significant factor in the doleful death of Desdemona, centered around the commonality of deceit, jealousy, and miscommunication of the likeness of Othello, Michael Cassio, Roderigo, Emilia, and Desdemona. This was assisted predominantly by their own oblivious nature…show more content…
The function of jealousy and how it consumes other characters develops the majority of the plot within the play. It primarily serves as a way to incite the character 's psyche and lead them to being reckless and negligent. Specifically, the way jealousy affects the minds of Othello and Roderigo through the manipulation tactics of Iago. Specifically, during many of Othello and Iago’s conversations. Iago slowly makes Othello believe in false proof of Desdemona 's affair, thus Othello begins to psychologically change by gradually turning to murder through justification of Iago’s statements on Desdemona: “One is too poor, too weak for my revenge. Now do I see 'tis true. Look here, Iago All my fond love thus do I blow to heaven. 'Tis gone. Arise, black vengeance, from the hollow hell! (III.iii.458-462). After Othello’s second meeting with Iago he is fully convinced that Desdemona must die, falling for Iago’s trap he loses all sense of rationale. Othello’s jealousy gets the best of him and it only gets worse when he abandons the love he has for Desdemona and begins to prepare for her killing. He is fully responsible for trusting Iago, instead of questioning Iago and going to Desdemona for clarification; he believes Iago without any sufficient evidence. Othello believes Iago to be a honest, reliable source instead of trusting his wife. He admits to himself that Desdemona is unfaithful by taking Iago’s word by not taking into account his wife’s honesty, someone he supposedly loves and cherishes, but instead his psyche gradually disintegrates and leads him to murdering
Open Document