Jealousy In Shakespeare's Othello

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The concept of jealousy is explored by William Shakespeare in the play Othello. Jealousy is a clear indication on how one fears and insecurities can be exploited and manipulated by those who are envious. Deceit can turn one against those whom they love and overwhelmed with emotion that it results in losing sanity and death. The theme of jealousy is prominent throughout the play and motivates character’s actions. Jealousy is so powerful it not only destroys others’ lives, but can lead to one’s own self destruction. Iago uses jealousy against each character for his own narcissistic desires. Jealousy is presented at the beginning of the play when Iago begins talking badly about Othello to Roderigo. Iago becomes very envious once he was demoted…show more content…
The author of the article uses 3 major concepts to compare Iago. The author uses 3 major concepts to compare Iago. The causing a gentleman to fall into madness, irrational behavior, and conspiring to use witchcraft. Witches seek for two things motivation and possession or gain. In this case Iago's motives are to seek revenge on Othello and Cassio. His devilish ways could be considered using witchcraft. I do not agree with the article about witchcraft. Iago was not using magic to cause such chain of events simply he just used manipulation and jealousy. I do not consider Iago a kind of male witch because he does not do the dirty work himself. He doesn’t “do” evil instead he takes self-gratification in being evil. (Evans 4). He works behind the scene pushing and infuriating Othello with jealousy then hides innocently. He plots and uses schemes to advance in his own desires. Although he does display satanic ways there was very little that was miraculous about his manipulation of Othello. Shakespeare utilizes Iago to the utmost to demonstrate the danger of jealousy. The purpose is to focus on how jealousy is the most corrupting and destructive emotions as humans. Shakespeare maybe was also making the point that it is foolish to believe everything you hear. Beware who you

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