Jean-Jacques Rousseau And The Age Of Enlightenment

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The concept of all people being equal was one that was new to the people of the age of Enlightenment. Equality would grant all men a say in their government and let them explore the world around them. Jean-Jacques Rousseau demonstrates how the ideals of society were changing when he states The common good is what is best for a society as a whole, not just for a few people or the individual or group that is acting. The common good is built upon equality. It is meant to ensure the welfare of all people regardless of social class. Abbe Sieyes says "Inequalities of wealth or ability are like the inequalities of age, sex, size, etc. In no way do they detract from the equality of citizenship." The thinkers of the Enlightenment believed that all…show more content…
This led to many new advancements in the sciences. In Frankenstein, Victor Frankenstein is able to pursue the studies he wants, depending on what he feels like getting involved in at the time. He says "In this mood of mind I betook myself to the mathematics, and the branches of study appertaining to that science, as being built upon secure foundations, and so worthy of my consideration."He is able to study whatever field he wants, when he wants to study it. The fields of science were rapidly advancing, because of the new freedom that was part of the cause of the Enlightenment thinkers. But, along with the new rights and freedoms people were to be acquiring, there would be new duties that they would also…show more content…
If there are to be elected officials, for instance, then the people have to be informed and vote. To some people, having this responsibility is a heavy burden. That is why it is hard to get people today to go out and vote. Also, for the common good of everyone, people would sometimes have to sacrifice things that they want or need. Giuseppe Mazzini says "Your first duties- first, at least in importance- are, as I have told you, to Humanity. You are men before you are citizens or fathers." The most important thing was humanity, followed by state and then family. Along with all the new things that people would be able to do, they would also have responsibilities they would struggle with when they encountered
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