Jean Jacques Rousseau Research Paper

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Jean Jacques Rousseau was born on 28 June 1712 in Geneva and died on 2 July 1778 In France. He was a French Philosopher and a writer. Rousseau prefer direct democracy as the best form of government. Laws are system of rules that are created and enforced by governmental institutions to regulate people’s behavior so that they will not take advantage and harm others or even themselves. Rousseau claims that “Man is essentially good in the state of nature” and complete freedom can only be achieved when man is not connected with the society. State of nature refers to the conditions of men and women before the concept of society and civilization began to resurface. The moment somebody thinks that something is their property, their minds became corrupted.…show more content…
In every part of his written books he outlines his thoughts and how they work in a fully functioned modern state. However, it doesn’t necessarily mean that he doesn’t believe in other principles of government. He believes in some principles of government that he thinks if being used accordingly can provide more of less the freedom they’d received in the state of nature. Rousseau’s contribution to political philosophy can be seen scattered around in his work. The most well-known work he created are Discourse on the Origins of Inequality, the Discourse on Political Economy, The Social Contract, and Considerations on the Government of Poland. One of his works “The Social Contract” explains how the state need to be guided by the member’s general will. That means everyone should decide how to run the state. His first major work is “Discourse on the Sciences and Arts”, it was the winning response to an essay contest conducted by the Academy of Dijon in 1750. In that particular book, Rousseau argues that sciences and arts progression has led to the corruption of virtue and morality. He thinks it is right for them to give up all their rights, not to a king, but to “the whole community,” all the
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