Jean Jacques Rousseau Essay

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Known as the modern Plato, Jean Jacques Rousseau, a philosopher and writer of the 18th century, left his mark in many areas from politics to the economy to education. According to Rousseau as societies evolve over time, people become interdependent and lose their original freedom and this can be seen in political communities where people live in dependence on each other and where inequality between men is highly rated. In the state of nature man lives alone, independent and free but when it begins to live in a society, he loses his original condition of freedom; he first begin to live as a family, then the families are grouped into societies and these later will create the state. The people are like the slaves, they would sell their freedom…show more content…
For Rousseau, we have the right to kill the enemy when it cannot be to slave; the right to slave people does not mean the right to kill them: so it 's an unfair exchange to make the salve buy his liberty for his life. Therefore, it can be seen that there is a clear contradictory in Rousseau claim since he said we have the right to kill the enemy but we have no right to control the freedom of his…show more content…
So the duty and interest require the social body and individuals to help each other. Thus, it can be seen that Rousseau envisages a republican government but admire especially the governmental system of direct democracy in which every citizen is sovereign. The most important condition for Rousseau offers the ideal state can be summed up in one word: independence. Rousseau found that autonomy and self-sufficiency are fundamental characteristics for the state since it’s clear that the interdependence of states is the one that leads to
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