Jean-Paul Sartre's Nausea

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Critically examine the philosophical ideas that are expressed in Sartre’s novel Nausea Jean-Paul Sartre was a French Philosopher, novelist and literary critic. He was born on the 21st of June, 1905. During his life, he was one of the important figures in the philosophy of existentialism and also one of the prominent individuals in the 20th century French philosophy and Marxism. Existentialism is a 20th century philosophy which is basically centred on the analysis of existence, freedom and choice. It is the understanding that humans define their purpose in life and try to make coherent decisions although they exist in an irrational universe (Mastin, 2008). Therefore, Existentialism believes that individuals are completely free and need to take…show more content…
Many existentialists have also regarded traditional systematic or academic philosophies, in both style and content, as nonconcrete and faraway from concrete human understanding (Kaufmann, 1956). Sartre dealt with existentialist themes in his 1938 novel Nausea. Nausea is a philosophical novel by the existentialist philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre, published in 1938. It is Paul Sartre's first novel (Paul-Sartre, 2010) and, as he would like to think, one of his best works (Charlesworth & Max, 1976). The novel happens in "Bouville" (actually, 'Mud town') a town like Le Havre, and it concerns a dejected history specialist, who gets to be persuaded that inanimate objects and circumstances infringe on his capacity to characterize himself, on his intellectual and spiritual freedom, summoning in the protagonist a sense of…show more content…
He feels that overwhelming a dreadful presence of existence is excessively for individuals to handle so they overlook and shroud it by just seeing its essence. He perceives the power of a being-for-itself to pick its own particular essence, pretty much as it chooses what colour an object appears to be. As a result of this decision, Sartre accepted that people were generally allowed to do whatever they needed. For sure, Roquentin consistently expresses that he simply desires to be free. Nevertheless with this freedom comes the responsibility regarding one's action. Sartre recognises that this amazing responsibility makes individuals restless and at last leads them to deny both their freedom and responsibility. For instance, Anny is reluctant to act in light of the fact that she would not like to be responsible for breaking with her past. As Sartre clarified, responsibility "sentences us to be
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