Jean Piaget Theory Analysis

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One of the most well-known cognitive developmental theorists is Jean Piaget. His theory of stage development proposed that children at different ages show qualitatively different ways of reasoning and understanding. Piaget suggested four main stages of development, namely: (1) The Sensorimotor Stage (birth to two years), (2) The Preoperational Stage (Ages 2 – 7), (3) The Concrete Operations Stage (Ages 7 – 12) and (4) The Formal Operations Stage (Ages 12 and beyond). At each stage, children think differently to how they had thought at the last stage. He mentioned that everyone goes through all the stages, regardless of individual differences in ability and environment. This essay will focus on the second stage of development, The Preoperational…show more content…
using an empty cardboard box as a rocket ship). However, there are still limitations such as egocentrism and precausal thinking. Egocentricism is the phenomenon where a person is not able to differentiate between their point of view and another’s point of view. Jean Piaget and Barbel Inhelder conducted a test called the ‘Three Mountain Task’. They placed a model of three mountains in front of a child, and a doll on the opposite side. The child was then asked what the doll would see from its position. The child was unable to answer correctly. In fact, the child would say the doll’s perspective was the same as the child’s own perspective, when in reality the doll’s perspective was very…show more content…
The Plowden report published in 1967 was the result of 1966 review of primary education that was very heavily influenced by Piaget’s theories (McLeod, 2009). McLeod also noted that Piaget focused on the internal biological maturation and therefore, he was very concerned with how ready the child was before a new concept was taught. According to Piaget, if the child is not deemed ready to be introduced to certain information, then the teachers must wait until the child attains a higher stage of cognitive development. This is imperative for schools and teachers, as they must be aware of the child’s calibre and
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