Utilitarianism Analysis

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Utilitarianism is an ethical doctrine explicitly formulated in the late eighteenth century and since then has had many supporters, particularly in the Anglo world. As its name suggests, its substance is to define the correction of any action by its utility, ie, for the results or consequences resulting from it. Hence this doctrine is also known by the name of consequentialism. The creator and configurator of utilitarianism was Jeremy Bentham (1748-1832) with his Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation (1780). In fact, it can be said that subsequent utilitarians have done nothing to tweak various aspects of the original proposal. Naturally, neither Bentham from zero to conceive his moral theory: Easily the influences of both…show more content…
This was none other than overhaul the UK legislation, which actually helped maintain social inequalities and remarkable political discrimination. And, according to the enlightened spirit of the time, nothing better to replace the inherited privileges based on a transparent, rational and secular legal system system. After determining the natural end of the pleasurable happiness, everything is to let the light of reason and sanction order right and wrong, abolishing all other rule from dark and unjustified instances (metaphysical, religious, traditional, etc.) . Actually, it is transferred to the social and political life of the criteria used for individual life, namely the sensible -and procedure classical-hedonism expressed by calculating the costs and benefits of each action to choose from in each case the most fruitful in terms of…show more content…
Bentham already faced this no easy task, as holding that pleasure motivates every action could explain how a moral principle that is characterized by selflessness and attention, however, to the generality of men? His response (broadcast until today all hedonism) is that there is also a pleasure, which also tend, coupled with altruism involves promoting the happiness of others. Thus, the principle of hedonistic utilitarianism is possible, but why is a moral duty? Bentham simply responds that this principle is unprovable, because it is a simple and first principle. Mill also defends the unprovability the utilitarian axiom. But also argues saying that, because we want happiness fact, this is the greatest good; and if it is for everyone, it will be for everyone. Sidgwick goes one step further by stating that the principle of utility is known by intuition; Moore also end up claiming the intuitive evidence for utilitarianism. However, and consequently, as was happened with the conception of the good in general, here empiricism has come to reject the intuitive evidence for it as dangerous sign of an arbitrary dogmatism, as they say, is one of private and subjective criteria. Thus, more recent utilitarian defend his doctrine from a position or non-cognitive justification, not rational. Bertrand Russell (1872-1970) in his mature thought so, since for him
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