Jerry Stanley's Inequitable Inccarceration

1458 Words6 Pages
Inequitable Incarceration The months before and during WW1 in America were a dark and gloomy period for the Japanese-American citizens. Many Japanese-Americans have shared their story of the internment camps during WW1 and Jerry Stanley, a victim of the camps noted, “I am proud that I am an American citizen of Japanese ancestry, for my very background makes me appreciate more fully the wonderful advantages of this nation.” (Stanley 3). Stanley was a proud american and appreciated the freedoms he had. It can be argued that the internment camps that imprisoned The Japanese were right and just, but how could this have been right for the land of the free to reject any citizens their natural born rights? Many Japanese-American citizens including…show more content…
The internment camps were unjust, and it was cruel to take away rights and subject those American Citizens to Harsh judgement and treatment from fellow Americans as well as the government itself. Whereas “normal” Americans resided to the comfort of their own homes, the Japanese-Americans trudged to cramped apartments some also known as horse stalls. Yoshiko Uchida and her family were forced to live in a horse stall after being taken from their homes. They were so called ¨apartments” but that idea was found comical seeing as the floorboards were still encrusted with manure (Stanley 2). Inside the internment camps, there was never enough of anything. There was lack of privacy and a lack of every basic necessity such as toilet paper, hot water, and good food (Stanley 4-5). Uchida describes her nights in the camp as cold, dirty and miserable (Stanley 3). It is in fact debatable if the lives of the Japanese would have been better or worse without the internment camps. As the war progressed after the bombing of pearl harbor, a boy named Shiro Nomura noticed his friendships withering. His friends never wanted to hang out with him and they even stopped inviting him to…show more content…
As we stood in what seems to be a bread line for the destitute, i felt degraded, humiliated and overwhelmed with a longing for home. I saw the unutterable sadness on my mother's face." (Uchida 3). This is Just a glimpse into the camp that Yoshiko Uchida had resided in for the almost full year that WWII had lasted. Uchida was a woman at the time, with sisters and her mother to care for. As she describes, the camps were cold and humiliating. Having to depend on the government who has turned on you to provide inadequate necessities and waiting in lines like beggars would surely dampen the spirit of any. In days prior, the hostility from other citizens had gotten to out of hand measures. For the Japanese, there were really no options for peace. The most amiable option was to leave their homes for the camps. At least there, they would be relatively safe from the terrors of racial slurs and discrimination. (Stanley 18-19) Though some Japanese citizens gave into the demands of the government and migrated to the camps, few were a bit stubborn, therefore resisting the order. Hideo Murata, a Japanese-American as well as a veteran of WWI, thought this order as a joke. He thought, surely there must be something wrong. He knew he was loyal to his country for he had laid his life on the line in the previous war. Upon hearing that the order to leave his home for imprisonment was indeed not a joke, Murata
Open Document