John F. Kennedy's Inaugural Speech: The Pursuit Of Happyness

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On January 20, 1961, John F Kennedy, the United States of America’s 35th president, gave his Inaugural Address. One of the most discussed statements from that speech was, “Ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country.” This statement has been discussed far and wide, mainly on whether or not one must realize that they cannot depend on others to succeed; they must depend on themselves to succeed.
When one is facing poverty, they must work as hard as they can to get out of it. “In 2014… there were 46.7 million people in poverty.” (DeNavas-Walt & Proctor 2015) Poverty has stricken America harshly, but no one truly tries to do anything about it. When one is experiencing poverty they tend to depend on the government to feed them and put a roof over their heads. Not every person in poverty is like this, but there is definitely a great sum of people who are. Poverty is quite difficult to overcome, mainly considering that it takes a great deal of hard work and dedication to pull himself out. One principal from Virginia is
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“The world is your oyster and it's up to you to find the pearls.” (Black, et al. The Pursuit of Happyness) It is commonly heard all around that the world is your oyster, and you decide what to do with it, but to succeed one must look for success and riches. The business world is a difficult one to be successful in, but no one has a chance to succeed unless they make the effort to succeed. The movie The Pursuit of Happyness, based on a true story, tells the story of a man who worked for years without salary in order to receive an intern position. Chris Gardner is left to raise his son, Christopher, on his own. The father and son duo spend their time living in multiple homeless shelters just to make do until Chris acquires the position he needs. In the end, Chris Gardner rises above the hard times and becomes a very well know Wall Street

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