John Gotti's Influence On Organized Crime

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One can argue that one of the most influential Dons of all time is John Gotti Sr. This mobster has played a major role in the Gambino crime family during the Modern Era. Eventually ratted out by his underboss, John Gotti’s legacy continues through today. In spite of being ratted out, the Teflon Don’s influence on organized crime is as important as any. Born on October 27, 1940, in the South Bronx, New York, Gotti was the fifth of thirteen children. Directly immigrating from Campania in Southern Italy, Gotti’s grandfather had had many children. In addition to John Gotti being inducted into the Gambino family, four of his brothers inducted too. Despite being one hundred percent Italian and having his brothers to back him up, Gotti’s surge to…show more content…
Because of John Gotti’s personal connection with the family, he felt responsible enough to kill the Irish immigrant who killed the Don’s cousin. Seeing his actions as “heroic” in a completely distorted way, the Gambino family accepted Gotti even more than before. In 1973 he was indicted for the murder of James McBratney, the Irish-American gangster who had killed the cousin of boss Carlo Gambino. After Gambino dies, Paul Castellano is appointed as the new boss of the family, despite being thought to be Dellacroce. This was a complete upheaval in the family, changing the order of the Dons. After Dellacroce passed away in 1985, Gotti was immediately given the opportunity to get rid of Castellano. On December 16, 1985, Castellano and his new second in command Thomas Bilotti were on their way to the Sparks Steak House in Manhattan where they would meet with Thomas Gambino. When Castellano stepped out of the vehicle he was approached by two gunman who fired six bullets in his body. When Bilotti jumped out to help he was also shot to death. John Gotti and Sammy Gravano were the ones who had mastered the plan. This lead to Gotti's elevation inside the family. Gotti was able to take the position of

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