John Hick's Analysis

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John Hick (1922- ) was born in England and professor of theology at the University of Birmingham in England. Hick’s was raised as a Christian and later became a philosopher in which he taught theology. He was known in particular for advocating his view with respect to religion and later shifting to religious pluralism. The theory of pluralist presented by john Hick is a fascinating one which align with Dalai Lama’s view on religion. Lama shared a similar view as Hick’s new approach to religion. As an evangelical, hick’s struggle with his faith, which resulted the change to pluralism after having observing other religious practices. Hick’s experience led to believe that most religions is particular has a similar objective. For Hick’s it became…show more content…
In a recent interview, Dalai Lama, shared a similar view s Hick’s does, Lama’s agreed with the idea of convergence, or integration, but to a smaller notch than Hick’s had suggested. Lama added, integration is a possibility, especially if different religions agree to exist together. But notably, in this particular instance, he is not necessarily agreeing with the possibility of convergence as Hick’s previously discussed. In particular, and accordingly, Lama, believes that in such a scenario it is likely improbable. Though the Dalai Lama takings a positive attitude and approach to various world religions, choosing to focus on a similar goal among them, but keep in mind that, Lama never loses sight of the fact that there are huge differences as well. Lama decided to take additional step and provided an illustration about Buddhism and Christianity, his view is that the fundamentals of principle of diverse values in each religion in most cases are comparable and by that each religion is focused to the success of eternal human happiness as a definitive goal. He also believes all religions highlight trustworthiness and humbleness; in which most is call for all religious believer to challenge one anther of becoming not only improved but better human beings. That is to say, all peoples of…show more content…
Christianity, however, believe in God as an eternal, enormous creator, although Buddhists believe the world has no primary basis or maker and there is not an eternal pure being such as the God of Christian ideology (Pojman, Solomom, Kierkegaard P. 662). Then again, seemingly on the side of religious pluralism, the Dalai Lama highlights how the notion of a supreme being as the creator entirely and dependence upon his will is a simple basic tenet that work for some people, while for others, dependence upon oneself and believing in the self as the creator is more beneficial for spiritual growth. In that sense, he perceives no issue nor does anything problematic among the two concepts. He then, highlight Buddhism itself as not being perfect, nonetheless it has its own issues as most religion does. Besides, he stresses that some has some philosophical doctrinal contrast existing inside Buddhism itself, especially when covering the philosophies of emptiness and selflessness. In particular, those are some of example of what he reflects as struggles within the philosophical arena (Pojman, Solomom, Kierkegaard
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