John Hume And Kant's Theory Of Morality

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clarified analogically in this manner: Theoretical philosophy explains how the concept of a cause gives rise to necessity while Practical philosophy explains how the concept of obligation brings about necessity even though the necessities of science and ethics might be wholly different. Consequently, Kant’s earlier investigation of the necessity of moral obligation is transferred to his treatment of critical philosophy in order to open a new approach to an old problem. For him, this ‘prospective reform’ must derive from a new objective notion which states that scientific and moral obligations are neither simply out there nor in us. While Hume’s challenge is by observing the notion of exclusive truth proposed by empiricists or rationalist which…show more content…
Kant’s transcendental idealism is kind of empirical realism in that he holds the manifestations of objects have objective validity, that is, the object is not given experiential characteristics other than a thing in it, that allowing for lawful experience is the essential expression of the transcendental aesthetic which Kant emphasizes in Groundwork and throughout his moral…show more content…
This natural necessity may be described as ‘A follows B.’ So, for instance, ‘Jack sees a cake, Jack has an appetite for cake’ and is then faced with multiple and varied options; Perhaps Jack will steal the cake from Tom to satisfy his lust. Humans, considered like Jake live under such scientific causal determinations. Whether one steals or not in Kant’s view is a phenomenal product of causal determination or simply put, a mere effect. However, the second possible cause, freedom can be called a moral necessity in an exclusive way. The specification of morality is abstracted from nature in that individuals face various kinds of laws in making moral choices. While moral law is not empirical or causal other than as a prior normative notion, humans as subjects under the law experience rationality and a phenomenal effect at the same time. In the phenomenal world, the scientific determination is actual but comparatively, it is morally possible when rational beings make a normative
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