John Proctor's Symbolism In The Crucible By Arthur Miller

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What is a crucible?
Arthur Miller’s “The Crucible” is a historical fictional story describing the Salem Witch Trials in Salem, Massachusetts in the late 1600’s. The story brings up the horror of the trials. It brings up how innocent people were falsely accused and charged for practicing witchery. One of the main characters, John Proctor, is a victim of false accusations. The name resembles a sturdy pot able to withstand great heat, a severe test, and high grade steel. The different meanings of a crucible are shown vividly throughout the story.
Moreover, the story’s name has symbolism. “The Crucible’s” definition as a sturdy pot can resemble John Proctor as an individual as he struggles through the great force of the court arresting his wife and having overcome his difficulties. He deals with Abigail Williams telling lies and convincing the court that John’s wife is a witch. “I have been near to murdered every day because I done my duty pointing out the Devil’s people-and this is my reward?” (Miller 84). It also may resemble his dynamic as a character, he has little change throughout the story. In the first act, he believes his affair with Abigail irreparably damaged him in
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The meaning of strong steel can resemble John’s strength. Even though he was convicted of a crime he did not commit, he doesn’t confess, causing him to hang, so his wife won’t have to. When John explains to Elizabeth that he will confess to the court, she understands that his reasoning is wanting them to go home and reestablish their family.“You came to save my soul, did you not? Here! I have confessed myself; it is enough” (Miller 104) Although steel can resemble his strength, it also symbolises how he has little dynamic in the story. Branching off of how “The Crucible” defines a sturdy pot, John Proctor does not show much change throughout the story, he remains a frustrated, courageous, and determined

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