John The Son Of Zebedee: An Analysis

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The author of the book of John’s gospel was John the son of Zebedee. The early church father says that author was “an apostle of Jesus Christ”, because “the author leaves tantalizing clue in his gospel which when examined in conjunction with the testimony of the early church father. ” On the other hand, “the author identifies himself as the disciple who Jesus loved (John 21: 20, 24) a prominent figure in the Johannine narrative (John 13:23; 19: 26; 20: 2; 21: 20, 24).” Above all, I think it not very important about John’s gospel date because “one of the points urged by those who favor a late date is the contention that the manner of referring to the Jews points to a time when they had become enemies of the church.” Perhaps, “throughout this…show more content…
If John is writing initially to the Ephesian ears, there are a number of expectations that come to the surface.” For that reason, scholars have various views about the date that the book of John was written. Some say “there is no reference in this Gospel to the destruction of Jerusalem. This, it is held, indicates that it was it was written either before that event or long enough after it for interest to have waned.” Therefore, some scholar “later put John’s gospel more difficult it is to account for his failure to make use of the other Gospels. A number of John’s expressions seem to indicate an early…show more content…
Primarily on the basis of the rabbinic tradition, Shemuel Safria concluded that the ability to write has fairly widespread… but less widespread than of reading which everyone process. Notwithstanding his uncritical use of rabbinical source. Safrai’s conclude that literary was widespread among Jews may be more current than.” We can see through “the historical and social context in which John’s gospel was composed has been reconstructed in various ways. Here we simply note three dimensions that will inform our theological reading of the text. First, the gospel presupposes Jewish tradition. The social world described in the gospel is one in which the followers of Jesus are mainly Jewish. The narrative also assumes that at least some of the readers will also be familiar with Jewish life and thought. John identifies Jesus as the fulfillment of the law and the prophets, and expects readers to catch allusions to biblical episodes like the angels ascending and descending on Jacobs Ladder (John 1:45,
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