John Wayne Gretzky Case

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John Wayne Gretzky was put on trial for fraud (wrongful or criminal deception intended to result in financial or personal gain), check kiting (taking advantage of the float to make use of non-existent funds in a checking or other bank account), conspiracy of robbery, murder in the second degree (any intentional murder with malice aforethought, but is not premeditated or planned), criminal negligence (“recklessness”), and forgery (the action of forging or producing a copy of a document, signature, banknote, or work of art). After the trial, it was decided by the Jury that John Wayne Gretzky was found innocent of fraud, check kiting, conspiracy of robbery, murder in the second degree, and criminal negligence. However, he was found guilty of forgery.…show more content…
The Prosecution provided an expert witness, specifically for handwriting, that brought up the addition of zeros. It was said that there was an addition of zeros to the check, making the check value to $20,000. However, the original value of the check wasn’t provided in the expert witnesses report. Therefore, the Jury was unable to make an accurate charge against the defendant. If the prosecution had provided more evidence, specifically stating the original and ending value of the check, then the Jury would have been able to distinguish if John Wayne Gretzky was indeed guilty of check…show more content…
Specifically, he was innocent of fraud, check kiting, a conspiracy of robbery, murder in the second degree, and criminal negligence, yet found guilty of forgery. He was found innocent of all other charges on the basis that not enough evidence was provided that could incriminate John Wayne Gretzky, nor did they have enough evidence the exact identity of the committee of these crimes - therefore the jury had no reasonable ground to charge John Wayne Gretzky of any of those crimes. He was, however, found guilty on the terms that there was no evidence of consent from Louise Mondelo regarding the forging of signatures on the two bank receipts with inconsistent signature and dates, and contained ink that matches that of John Wayne Gretzky. Therefore, the jury decided to charge John Wayne Gretzky the same amount of money he had taken from Louise’s account, $20, 000, using the forged signatures, and also sentence him to one year in prison. If he was unable to pay the fine he received, the jail sentences would increase for each amount he was unable to
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