Journey In Jane Eyre

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This paper tackles Jane Eyre's journey to get belonging. This journey passes five phases. The paper is not going to focus on these chronological phases in details or to highlight on them, rather, the major task of the researcher is to discuss two major points: Jane's consistent endeavors to have belonging and the moral stance of Jane to achieve this purpose. Of Course these two points will give the researcher a convenient chance to manipulate such characters as Rochester and Bertha. The researcher will try to expose Charlotte Bronte's conventionality, which is so obvious in tacking many crucial situation, particularly between Jane, Bertha and Rochester. The researcher is interested to show which goal Jane dreams to achieve, love…show more content…
Doubtless, this attitude represents a problem for Bronte. To some extent, she fails to shape an ideal orphan not only to the Victorian society, but also to any objective reader considering the different destines of both Jane and Bertha: "Yes" responded Abbot, "if [Jane] were a nice, pretty child, one might compassionate her forlornness: but one really cannot care for such a little toad as that" ( Bronte, 28). At the first glance, Jane appears to be a romantic novel in which the penniless, orphaned heroine, gets a home, and wealth at the end. But many of the critics regarded the novel to be "a dangerous book due to the outrages on decorum, as well as the moral perversity of a woman who defied Victorian social conventions" (Mozley, 432). Bronte can present her moral purpose in Jane Eyre in a calm manner to be more…show more content…
Their union was " in the space between classes… socially ambiguous, and this ambiguity is part of the legacy to Jane." ( Fraiman, 616). She was born poor and when her parents died without leaving her any money, she became dependent on others to care for her. Despite this better fact, Jane still demands to be treated as an equal to her relations and she becomes irate if treated unfairly. Indeed, " What horrified the Victorians was Jane's anger" ( Gilbert and Gubar, 338). According to Parama Roy, Jane's words prove to the Victorian reader that Jane is "witty, proud, unsubmissive, and quick to demand her rights and resent her injuries- qualities manifestly foreign to a child in her position" (Roy,714). Even the servants are flustered by Jane's behavior, and are often telling
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