Judas And Mordd: A Comparative Analysis

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Born with a moral compass, humans possess the power to seek out their innate nature. The monsters from the stories Morte Darthur and “Matthew 26-28” are Mordred and Judas. Judas was from a Jewish culture, while Mordred was from a British culture. These stories are similar in regards to how their “monsters” betray their kings. Jeffrey Cohen’s thesis “The monster stands at the threshold of becoming” brings out the main point of both stories in that it shows how the true roots of an individual are planted with the dark seed of betrayal. The qualities that both Mordred and Judas possess are seen as traits that humans are already born with. The similarities are important to understand, due to the fact that both characters were driven by primal instincts…show more content…
Possessing gentleman qualities were a large component of British culture in the 14th century. Chivalry was considered to be a way of life to the people of Camelot, although this specific kingdom was created as a fictional society. Knights, and those who were not knights, all obeyed the proper code of conduct. The code of conduct was based on one’s ability to respect authority and on treating others in a loving manner. Gawain, an honorable knight, is a strong example of the chivalry code. Some of the rules state “A true friend to lovers of women, courteous and meek or gentle” (Malory 317). Gawain proves to be loyal to Lancelot when he refuses to betray him after discovering his affair with Queen Guinevere, unlike Mordred. This shows Gawain’s devotion to friendship and loyalty to Lancelot. The traitor, Mordred, forces readers to question Cohen’s intriguing thought that says “They ask us to reevaluate our cultural assumptions about sexuality… perception of difference and tolerance towards [these differences] expression” (28). Largely, Mordred also forces the people, including the knights, of Camelot to recognize the sexual acts between Lancelot and Guinevere and expresses their views of tolerance differently than Mordred and instead remain loyal to Lancelot and Guinevere to try to maintain peace in the kingdom. The knights are tolerant towards Lancelot because they are aware of his position in the…show more content…
The Synoptic Gospels speak an abundant amount about Christian Roman culture as well as Jewish culture. The language in Rome was Latin, but most local dwellers spoke Aramaic. The New Testament was later translated to Greek but was originally written in Hebrew because the Jews were the original authors. Roman records claim that Jesus of Nazareth established numerous communities, such as Jewish and non-Jewish Gentile communities (The Christian Bible 18). Christian culture views Jesus of Nazareth as their Messiah, the one who would save them from their sins (The Christian Bible 18). Jesus of Nazareth was ultimately murdered by Roman soldiers at the hands of his own people, the Jews. Roman culture did not value his teaching and preferred power and strength over humility. This Biblical era was known to be brutal with beatings and excruciating punishment while Jerusalem was under Roman rule. “Matthew 27” tells of the crucifixion of Jesus of Nazareth, executed by the Roman soldiers. The text says, “And they stripped him and put a red mantle about, and wove a wreath of thorns and out it on his head, and put a red in his right hand, and knelt before him and mocked him saying: Hail King of the Jews” (The Christian Bible 30). Jesus portrays his selfless spirit effortlessly on the cross. His spirit ties in seamlessly with his teaching of brotherly love and
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