Juliet Enduring Woman Analysis

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Juliet: Maturing Woman
As teenagers grow, they rebel and leave the nest, and can have little thought as to how this affects other people. Juliet Capulet is a stunning example of this exact concept. At 13, Juliet is finally growing into herself and who she wants to be, and becoming a fully fledged woman by leaving her childhood comforter, the Nurse, for her husband, and earning the title of “Maturing Woman”. Her growth and maturation as a person can be seen clearly through the play, coming clearly into the light in Act 3 Scene 5, first through her conversation with her mother and the masterful way she worked through those rocky waters, and secondly through her comment about the nurse and how they will never be as close. Capulet also calls her
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Shakespeare infers that emotional maturity is linked to sexual maturity, and that marriage is a big step that marks a transition into adulthood. Juliet becomes a woman in the eyes of society the night before Act 3 Scene 5, and uses this empowerment in her fight against her mother. Juliet breaks that bond whilst expertly spins double entendres, saying what her mother wants to hear but also saying the exact opposite. She says she will “never be satisfied” until she sees “him - dead - “is (her) poor heart for a kinsman vexed” and this could be taken in two different ways, either she wants to see Romeo dead, or she is sad for Tybalt. Once her father comes in, Juliet attempts to also sever the bond, although he manages to do it all himself, threatening “for my soul, I’ll ne’er acknowledge thee” if she does not end up marrying Paris. Lastly, and most importantly, Juliet turns away from her closest confidant and friend, the Nurse. Juliet calls her a “damned old lady” and ‘wicked fiend,” stating that “thou and (her) bosom henceforth shall be twain.” Although she says this to herself, in her mind, she is breaking the last of her ties to childhood, she realises she can’t rely on her Nurse anymore. This last step is the final difference, bringing her changing loyalties into light. Juliet clearly demonstrates that they are to her…show more content…
In the same scene, Juliet demonstrates her transition to womanhood by breaking ties with her family and re-stating her loyalties to Romeo. Although “maturing woman” could seem redundant or repetitive, the fact that they are closely linked creates the idea that, throughout the play, this ‘growing aspect’ is the most important facet of her person. “Maturation” encompasses her change, from the beginning of the play until the end, as well as her sneakiness, and clever way with words, as well as leads into the other points. “Woman” reinforces the idea of maturing, and also puts into perspective Juliet’s place in society as a teenage girl, giving reason for why she did what she did, first changing her loyalties, as well as how she took matters into her own hands. Once analysing the further parts of the play, it’s almost laughable to think of Juliet as some wilting flower. Although infatuation made her do many things, she became smarter and a little conniving to get what she wanted, forced to and influenced by the society and world around her. Juliet Capulet demonstrated huge growth throughout the play, and definitely earned the title of “Maturing
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