Julius Caesar Rhetorical Devices Essay

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Shakespearean Rhetoric In order to learn how to use rhetorical devices successfully, you really have to have a true understanding of Shakespeare’s intent on words . The selected passages from Act III, scene II of William Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar are the perfect tutorial for those who want to learn the basic rules of argumentation. This scene describes the events that took place after Caesar’s death. Brutus, who is the close friend of Caesar, is also one of his assassinators. He delivers an oration in order to defend himself. On the other hand, Mark Antony wants to persuade the audience that Brutus is guilty. He is not allowed to speak directly, which is why Antony uses special rhetorical devices. While reading the Act III, scene II of …show more content…

Brutus faces with the inner psychological drama, which is why his speech has two main goals. First, he tries to persuade the audience that the assassination of Caesar is the necessary action thats made in order to save Rome from trouble. Secondly, Brutus tries to persuade himself that he killed Caesar because this was his duty, not for his own purposes. The character begins his speech with the rhetorical device of antimetabole. He repeats the words in successive clauses while placing them in reverse grammatical …show more content…

As Caesar loved me, I weep for him; as he was fortunate, I rejoice at it; as he was valiant, I honour him: but, as he was ambitious, I slew him…(Act III, scene II). Again, the usage of anaphora is very effective here. All the rhetorical devices used by Brutus are successful. He managed to get approval from the audience. However, his speech didnt bring him the final victory, as Mark Antony discredited his actions. According to the play, Mark Antony would be allowed to make a funeral speech for Caesar only if he did not blame the conspirators for Caesar’s death. However, his intention was opposite to the promise he gave. Antony’s speech is strong because he uses emotionally charged rhetoric in order to manipulate with the position of the audience. At the beginning of the speech the audience stands completely by the Brutus’s side: Fourth Citizen: “Twere best he speak no harm of Brutus here”. First Citizen: “This Caesar was a tyrant” (Act III, scene II). Antony’s speech begins by justifying the actions of Brutus. It seems so because the speaker uses the device of contrast: I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him. The evil that men do lives after them; The good is oft interred with their bones… (Act III, scene

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