Jungian Analysis Theory

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Introduction Studies of psychological theories are arguably the most relevant branches to examine to ascertain progress in a psychologist-client relationship, alongside client growth. The foundation that is essential to understand the inner workings of a client’s mind and the subsequent external behaviour is built from knowledge provided by theoretical insight. This paper will provide an abridged theoretical insight on Jungian Analysis- is the theory of the mind that stresses the value of wholeness for everyone. Aspects looked at will include: a historical background, key theorist description, key concepts, merit, techniques employed, critiques and relevance in the current context. Historical Background In 1907 Carl Jung met Sigmund Freud in…show more content…
Word association discloses complexes - collections of often repressed and related unconscious associations, impulses or ideas that cause a habitual pattern of behaviour or thought of a person (Mitchell, n.d.). The Word Association Test devised by Jung was an experimental method which provided an objective basis for some of Freud’s ideas, to identify complexes Jung used a tool called the psychogalvanometer (Lu, 2012). Psychogalvanometers as explained by Jung (1947) measure skins resistance of a miniscule electrical current, Jung further states that a persons general mood and immediate emotional reactions influence and alter the electrical resistances magnitude. Causes of skin resistance influences and changes can be attributed to altering levels of cortical arousal. Transference as mention by Sanders (1989) is a useful way of attuning to the clients progress. Dream analysis, although not as in use as in Freudian psychology, was used by Jung to reveal unconscious material to the client (Connor, 2014). Jung introduced the face to face of working with a client (Sander,…show more content…
83) continues throughout ones’ life instead of it being restricted to childhood (Lu, 2012). Connor (2014) claims that the method that Jung used was not adequately systematic and that Jung placed far too great of an importance on religious convictions, studies of occult practises, mysticism and spiritualism. Some analysists are of the opinion that Jung’s theory is unempirical, unintelligible, indistinct, contradictory and inconsistent (Samues, 1985). Lu (2012) pointed out that Jung’s theory is unviable as one cannot simply prove or disprove some of Jung’s claims, as some concepts are overly ambiguous. A few analysists have gone as far as to say that many concepts of Jungian psychology are irrelevant to contemporary cultures (Connor,
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