Junk Food Essay

794 Words4 Pages
The best part of school lunches may be a child's biggest problem: junk food. School plays a very pertinent role in a child's life, both academically and nutritionally. School meals set the precedent for what a child will eat for their entire lives. As a result, many people have begun to call for a ban on junk food, and to bring fruits and vegetables back to school cafeterias. Even though it might be expensive to switch to healthier food, junk food should not be allowed in schools. Childhood obesity is becoming more prevalent partly due to the food children are feed in schools, school food is what what fuels children in order to get through their day, and healthy eating habits start early on. Obesity is becoming more prevalent…show more content…
In a study done by Harvard T.H. Chan, researchers found that the less time students are given to scarf down their lunches, the less fruits and vegetables they eat. In our school system, more than 30 million children are eating free or reduced-price meals. Of course there is the budget to worry about, as is one of the main concerns of the other side of the argument. But should schools really keep feeding children food that hurts them for the sake of money? Both things considered, it is fair to say that with all the children relying on school meals to give them the nutrition and energy they need and the dwindling time children have to consume their food, school meals need to be focused on giving children more fruits and…show more content…
Obesity in children is becoming more and more common as the food in schools change. In order for a child to make it through the day, they must have sufficient nutrients from school meals. In order for a child to build healthy eating habits, they must start eating healthy at a young age. The best part of a school lunch is undoubtedly the pack of Pop-Tarts or donuts, but, all things considered, that delicious junk food is really the biggest thing holding students back from achieving their dreams. If schools make the switch to healthier food, they are likely to see themselves, and, most importantly, the students benefit
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