Justice In Fahrenheit 451

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Social justice is often strived for by society. It is a necessary force in allowing humankind to coexist. However, the individual also has to play a role in maintaining social justice. The role of the individual is stated in the texts Fahrenheit 451 and “The Pedestrian” by Ray Bradbury and “Letter From Birmingham Jail” by Martin Luther King Jr. by illustrating the consequences of not participating in the monitoring of justice. The stories show how much each individual fights for equality and justice, no matter the situation. Fahrenheit 451 describes a society where reading books are illegal. “Letter From Birmingham Jail” is a letter from MLK Jr. to some of his fellow clergymen discussing what he is doing in Birmingham and why he’s doing…show more content…
Montag hides some books until he finds the courage to read them. He goes from burning books to a book reader, effectively demonstrating his objection towards his society. The society forces people to watch their television instead of going outside or having meaningful conversations. They don’t even have porches“’[…but Clarisse’s] uncle say that was merely rationalizing it; the real reason, hidden underneath, might be they didn’t want people sitting like that, doing nothing, rocking, talking; that was the wrong kind of social life. People talked too much. And they had time to think.[…]’”(Bradbury, 60) Montag’s view of society dramatically changes after his discussions with the girl mentioned above, his neighbor. His neighbor’s free-thinking ideas influence him to believe that it is a dystopian society he lives in, even though almost everyone thinks of it as utopia. He kills the Chief and the other firemen to prevent them from going after a fellow book reader. “[The firemen] turned, their faces like blanched meat, streaming sweat; [Montag] beat their heads, knocking off their helmets and bringing them down on themselves. They fell and lay without moving.”(Bradbury, 113) By doing so, Montag openly protests against the society that he lives
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