Justice In Plato's The Republic

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What is justice? The Republic by Plato aims to essentially this question with distinct discussions about the different components of justice. The ethic is a foundational element into the philosophical questions one encounters. Not only does the literary work aim to form a definition of justice, but also aims to prove how justice will arise. In a discussion with Glaucon, Socrates explains how he believes justice will develop. Justice will emerge when philosophers rule the just city. Socrates believes the thinkers are quintessential to the ideal city for aristocracy and continues by justifying his reasoning. He proceeds into a discussion about the regimes of injustice, comprised with a discussion about democracy. Socrates ultimately argues that …show more content…

He asserts that the just city is possible if a philosopher, with good intentions rules. Coincidently, he believes philosophers should avoid political regimes, however ruling a just city may arise such leadership. Socrates states that philosophers are able to know the truth and are essentially the uppermost of the educated. One is philosopher through education and should study the Form of Good. Socrates refutes those who falsely claim to be philosophers as they come into power once society deems the legitimate philosophers useless. Knowledge is integrated within philosophy, as it is based on facts and truthfulness. Theorists use these distinctions as a means to determine the ethics of life. Additionally, Socrates argues that philosophers are wise; they have lived a life full of complexities, and have gained the knowledge to rule a just city effectively. He asserts his view using the analogy of the cave. …show more content…

Socrates continues by describing how the regimes are considerably disparate to the just city. In general, the aristocracy will become corrupted as guardians will make mistakes in assigning individuals to classes; the root of conflicts. Socrates continues by discussing the four regimes of injustice: timocracy, oligarchy, democracy, and tyranny. Timocracy can be described as the pursuance of recognition. This regime will befall as the guardians will love wealth to the extreme that the generals become the richest. Oligarchy arises from timocracy as it is based on wealth. The government will subside as the rich will overpower the poor and the poor will revolt. Furthermore, democracy will arise from oligarchy as liberty is the central ideal. On the contrary, demagogues will compete for the power of the prime. Tyranny will arise as individuals will want to do as they please. Tyrants will compete with one another, and the government will collapse. Socrates states that democracy is essentially when, “…the poor win, killing some of the others and casting out some…” (235). Socrates explains that democracy arises when there is a divide between the rich and the poor. Socrates believes this aspect contributes to democracy being a weak government as revolts and the aim to become rich, overpower the ideal of the government. The classes are skewed and there is no balance within the city. In addition, Socrates

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