Juveal's Satire

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Corruption in the critical eyes of Juvenal is the decline or reversal of the Republic into the Empire (Quintero, 2007, p. 298) Through Umbricius’ justification of his exodus, Juvenal communicates the lack of decent professions, as only those who are immoral succeed, the corruption due to wealth; however ultimately Juvenal expresses his disgrace as Rome has declined from republican ideals to a city of foreigners (Scholtz, A. 2013). In accordance with his preceding satires, Juvenal’s fourth satire comprises the criticising of Roman vices, specifically the tyrannical emperor Domitian. This satire narrates the appearance of an enormous rhombus fish (Stewart, R., 1994), filling the entirety of the bay off Ancona, a seaport on the Adriatic coast.…show more content…
The rhombus fish’s inability to be accommodated by an appropriately sized plate compares with the ethical…show more content…
Furthermore, it is evident that although Juvenal lacks consistency in structure and tone, his attitude never deviates. Through his criticism of Roman society, he maintains that Rome is permeated with corruption and utilizes the theme of jealousy to communicate his disgrace of the social and political degradation of Rome (Brians, P. 1998). Juvenal bemoans a society tormented by unending corruption, suggesting Rome was not an honest or desirable place of residence. “[Juvenal] was thus eminently fitted on the ground of personal experience to describe the manners of Imperial Rome at the period of her worst corruption…” (Halsall, P. 1999). Juvenal’s analysis on corruption concludes that the morals of society were questionable due to debased ethics of corrupt politicians, “…[Juvenal] holds up a mirror to every part of the private life of the Rome of his day, and by the most caustic and trenchant invective seeks to shame her out of her vices.” (Halsall,
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