Juxtaposition Of Gender In Anton Chekhov's The Bear

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In an analysis of Anton Chekhov’s The Bear, we find a world out of balance with sexist stereotypes and a juxtaposition of femininity and masculinity in Popova and Smirnov. Man versus Woman, at least the preconceived notions of what male and female roles are. Men are “beasts” and women are untrue. Ironically during the show we see that women can be “beastly” and both men and women have the capacity to cheat and be untrue. My lighting design concept was to capitalize on this dichotomy. Creating a warm environment with lighting while the scenic elements are dark and closed off from the rest of the world. First, working with a proscenium stage (at 38’ opening), I would establish area lighting and gel all area lighting with Rosco 06 No color …show more content…

I have never used LED, intelligent, or moving lights. My experience is with ellipsoidals, fresnels, par cans, and scoops. I have used an ETC board with 96 channels. Lighting areas will include two lights for each area (45° angles without down light). Again, these will have Rosco 06 No color straw as the gel for natural light and skin tones. I would utilize submasters to program specials and area lighting. For example, I would program submasters 1-12 for the corresponding areas. I would also program specials and color washes on the submaster. Because of my lack of faith in technology, I have rarely used cues. Submasters do make it easier to program cues, so I have left it to my light technicians to determine whether they wish to use cues or …show more content…

All the practical lighting will be warm in nature. The candles will create a warm light around Popova as she mourns her husband and gazes at a photograph of him as the play opens. As Luka enters more light will be brought in and he will turn on the other lamps in the room. The lighting will create a mood of optimism, but the use of some yellow undertones will cause some irritability as the characters moods shift. Luka’s entrance and warmer, brighter lighting brings optimism into Popova’s mournful opening of the play. As Smirnov enters lighting will be brighter and bolder, including more reds as his character is passionate about all he does. Changes in levels will reflect changes within the scenes. Specials will be used to focus the audience's’ attention and intensify

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