Reason In Kant's Transcendental Dialectic

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In book one of the Transcendental Dialectic, Kant deals with the concept of pure reason. He asserts that these concepts which are derived from pure reason are accomplished by inference and not by reflection alone. The notions of reason are Ideal inventions which though in a certain sense rest upon experience but it go beyond the limits of experience. Generally, the concepts of reason allow us to comprehend while the concepts of understanding assist one to understand. The difference portrayed between concepts achieved through reflection and concepts obtained by inference seems to be misleading whereas the groupings of understanding state experience and so facilitates the unity of consciousness which is necessary to all reflection. The purpose…show more content…
But I think the difference seem to be implicitly implied in the reference of the two terms that is transcendental and transcendent. The ideas are transcendental by being ascribed to the very nature of Reason and when they surpass the confines of experience, they are said to be transcendent. The Kantian use of the terms ‘subject’ and ‘object’ in the same passage seems puzzling. The term ‘object’ is used in a metaphysical sense which is proper only from the pre-critical stance of the Critique, to mean the existence captured through pure thought. On the other hand, the term ‘subject’ obtains a compatibly un-critical implication. The phrase ‘the merely speculative use of Reason’ as used by Kant seems to be deceptive even though one is aware that Kant uses the terms speculative and theoretical synonymously. Despite the deception perceived, Kant’s anticipated meaning seems to be clear enough. When one claims that a concept of Reason is merely an Idea, what comes to mind is the degree to which it can be empirically…show more content…
It is proper to try and understand some of the terms used. A system is an organised structure. In this case it implies examining this structure. The transcendental dialectic as whole has to contain completely a priori origin of certain modes of knowledge derived from pure reason as well as certain inferred concepts, the object of which can never be given empirically. Generally the transcendental ideas are used for ascending syllogisms and understanding carries out the descending. This brings about a connection and unity among the transcendental ideas that allows one’s reason to combine all its modes of knowledge in a
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