Karl Marx's Theory Of Capitalism And Marxism

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By the time this Manifesto was written, Germany was a world leader in industrialization. Germany was a society based on manufacturing goods and services in mass through mechanized and assembly lines methods of production. The Industrial Revolution lead to precariousness, rural depopulation and the apparition of a working class. The system was based upon freedom and property. Karl Marx, a socialist economist, brought a revolutionary critique of capitalism of that time — inspired by Friedrich Hegel and supported by Friedrich Engels. In 1848, Marx, Engels and The Committee (Schapper, Bauer, Moll and Wolff) wrote a manifesto ‘Demands of the Communist Party in Germany’. What influenced them to write it? What was their goal? Have these measures…show more content…
He states that it is impossible to access to an isolated individual because human beings cannot individualize themselves from the society — either they are workers or employers. It is only possible to access to human beings through classes. To define this notion of classes, Marx does not exclusively focus on individuals’ wealth, profession nor their ownership of means of production. In addition to this objective factor, there is a subjective one that is even more meaningful — he considers that a class exists depending on individuals’ consciousness of belonging. None society is unite because the different classes are always confronting each other as they have opposite interests. The economist Marx defines a tendency towards a polarization of classes in capitalist societies — he suggests that the class structure consists of two classes which are the bourgeoisie and the proletariat. The capitalist method of production produces necessarily social conflicts between these two classes which have distinct interests: this phenomenon is called the class struggle. Marx starts his Manifesto with a sentence that proves how primordial is this notion of class struggle : « The history of all hitherto existing society is the history of class struggles. » It is an economic analysis of the History — considering the relations of production. It is Marx, and his collaborator Engels, who…show more content…
During the German Revolution of 1918-1919, Rosa Luxembourg and Karl Liebknecth were the leaders of the movement but it ended in defeat for the communists. Same for the creation of the Hungarian Soviet Union which only last five months, and so on. To date, humans over the world never accepted to give up their freedom to gain equality. To find a rational explanation to this phenomenon, could we suppose that the majority of the world’s population consider freedom over equality? Are we influenced by the society to think that way or is natural for humans to look for freedom rather than equality? The United States clearly chose freedom over the rest. And americans are proud of it. While France chose ‘liberty, equality and fraternity’ as its
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