Karma In The Mahabharata

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In this world, Karma plays a pivotal role. Many Indian writers, irrespective of their languages write about Nationalism. Colonialism is a concept where people from one country dominates and rule other country. This concept has been there from many centuries. Nationalism and colonialism are directly proportional to each other. If the people are under the hands of colonial society then nationalism is highlighted in the form of novels, stories, plays, songs, etc. People without nationalism are not eligible to live in a country. This paper focuses mainly on the concept of Karma in various novels in different Indian languages like Sanskrit, Hindi, Telugu, Bengali, Tamil and English. Keywords: Sanskrit epics, Transition, Independence, colonial rule,…show more content…
“Karma Nye vadikaraste maa phaleshu tada chana Maa karma phalahe durbu maate sangosva karmani”1 -Bhagavad-Gita This means every incident in this life is predestined. That is called as fate( Karma) accept it silently. Thus begins the debate on an epic scale regarding the problems of action versus non-action, violence versus non-violence, and ultimately about Dharma. The Gita is incorporated in the Mahabharata primarily to give an integrated view of Dharma. Dharma means to perform righteously one‟s duty in a selfless way (Nish Kama Karma) with complete dedication to the will of God. The survivors of the epic war discover that public esteem and power are not more than hollow victories in an illusory struggle. It is not bravery but knowledge which is the key to the mystery of life. In devotional poetry, God descends on this earth as a human being to share with us our suffering and turmoil, our happiness and prosperity. In Indian literature the effort has been made to find out how a man achieves divinity by serving man kind. In fact, epics like the Ramayana and the Mahabharata received a rebirth in the new languages. These languages gave a fresh life, a renewed relevance, and a meaningful .…show more content…
Indian writers like Bankim Chandra Chatterjee (Bengali, 1838-1894) and others made use of this newly acquired concept of nationalism to attack colonial rule, and in the process created their own brand of nationalism, rooted in the native land. Bankim Chandra wrote many historical novels like Durgesh Nandini (1965), and Anand Math (1882), acquired a pan-Indian popularity and made nationalism and patriotism a part of dharma. This was a distinctive concept of universalism that was accepted by many as a reply to western colonialism. Revivalism and reformism were natural corollary of the newly emerging idea of nationalism. Rabindra Nath Tagore (Bengali, 1861-1942) said that the unity of India always be in the diversity. The foundation for this tradition had been laid in India at the social level by saints like Nanak, Kabir, Chaitanya and others. As a result, India‟s nationalism is mingled with its spiritual tradition, with truth and tolerance preached by Mahatma Gandhi and Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru, showing India‟s concern for its pluralism. Modern Indian pluralism is multi-lingual, multi-cultural, secular, national-state concept. Patriotic writings proliferate almost spontaneously in different languages, as
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